The Best Open-Source Continuous Integration Tools (Updated Nov. 2017)

Best open-source continuous integration tools (UPDATED as of November 27, 2017):

  1. TravisCI
  2. Jenkins
  3. GoCD
  4. Buildbot
  5. CruiseControl
  6. Hudson

Continuous Integration software let developers incorporate code into a shared repository, allowing them to test applications frequently. Users test code automatically and ensure the software builds integrity. Unlike proprietary software, which remains the property of the original developer (usually the company who created the CI tool), open-source continuous integration tools are free to use and can be modified and redistributed.

Open-source tools may help solve a few different developer problems. Since open-source tools are free, these types of continuous integration tools give startups, small businesses and developers who work on side projects a resource to use on a budget. Another added benefit is that these tools are customizable, allowing developers to take the foundation of a CI tool and build on top of it to fit the needs of their problems.

here are A FEW of the best open-source CI programs

Travis CI

60 Reviews 4.6 out of 5 stars

"Build apps with confidence," says the Travis CI website. The program automates software development and deployment and runs code on multiple machines. Companies use Travis CI to build and test applications hosted at GitHub, which is an online Git repository hosting service. Travis CI supports software builds in various programming languages, such as JavaScript, Java, Ruby, C++ and Scala, and has been used by some of the world's biggest brands such as Facebook, Twitter and Mozilla. Users watch their tests in real-time and perform tests in parallel.

What Users Say

"I am using Travis CI to test my libraries, upload coverage to coveralls and deploy documentation to GitHub Pages," says a user who reviewed this program. "The main benefits are from GitHub integration."

Jenkins

161 Reviews 4.2 out of 5 stars

Jenkins is an open-source continuous integration tool written in the programming language Java. It automates various tasks associated with software development and can be configured via its Web-based management console. Developers use this program to build tests across multiple platforms and streamline continuous integration and delivery. Users also access extensions from the Jenkins store (such as build management plugins and source code management tools) to improve functionality.

What Users Say

"I would highly recommend Jenkins to anyone trying to automate certain manual processes," says a user. "It has helped us solve a lot of issues we have had with our current manual build processes."  

GoCD

14 Reviews 4.0 out of 5 stars

GoCD is an open-source continuous integration and deployment platform from ThoughtWorks that allows users to build, deploy and test their new release automatically. For enterprise use cases, the product offers a proprietary SaaS offering to allow companies to have higher level of security with their application.

What Users Say

A GoCD review says "I like that you can model whatever process you want, and that the fan in / fan out features allow you to run networks of processes in parallel in a predictable way. The dependency resolution allows you to run repeatable builds and reduce the amount of re-work you pipeline has to do."

Continuous integration is a crucial component of a coder's software portfolio. While proprietary software comes at a premium, open-source tools reduce costs and allow for more flexibility. The programs on this list help companies execute and test code so they can detect problems early on in the software development cycle.

Strider

10 Reviews 4.3 out of 5 stars

Strider is an open source continuous integration and delivery platform typically integrated with MongoDB. Most users connect Strider to GitHub or BitBucket for test automation and repository usage. It comes with an extensive API that many users describe as helpful. Users described continuous integration and GitHub integration as the product's biggest benefits.

What Users Say

A Strider is a continuous integration and deployment platform written in the programming languages Node, JS and JavaScript. The program is highly customizable, with various plugins that optimize software development. For example, users can register an HTTP route, modify user interfaces within the Stride console and add custom database fields. Strider is published under a BSD license.

What Users Say

"Strider is integral in our testing and deployment process," says a Strider review. "We have custom-tailored it to our specific needs of wrapping up branch-specific deployment packages from our different software modules." Continuous integration is a crucial component of a coder's software portfolio. While proprietary software comes at a premium, open-source tools reduce costs and allow for more flexibility. The programs on this list help companies execute and test code so they can detect problems early on in the software development cycle.      

Buildbot

16 Reviews 4.3 out of 5 stars

Buildbot is an open-source continuous integration tool that automates various code tasks. It was first released in 2003 and is written in the Python programming language. Developers use this software to implement tests on various platforms and access extensive status reports. Other features include build automation and application deployment. Buildbot’s website also has a directory of resources and manuals for developers who want to build better code.

What Users Say

A Buildbot reviewer says it can, "set up automatic deployment for my Python/PHP applications in less than half an hour, even in minutes." He adds, "The deployment process and result can be viewed by different people at the same time."

CruiseControl

11 Reviews 3.3 out of 5 stars

CruiseControl is an open-source continuous integration and extensible framework for creating build automation processes. There are many plugins available for source control, build tools and team collaboration.  It's based on SourceForge and has a rich user community. It currently ranks as a niche tool on G2 Crowd's Continuous Integration Grid.

What Users Say

"If you are in need of some sort of continuous integration system, there are quite a few options. You might heard of Jenkins, or Travis. But setting them up requires a lot of knowledge, lot of tools and a separate machine (or few)," said one CruiseControl Reviewer "If you need a simple solution, that is easy to install and that will just work, CruiseControl is the way to go. It does not have all the bells and whistles of the big systems, but it makes the job done."

Hudson

5 Reviews 3.4 out of 5 stars

Hudson is an open-source continuous integration tool with many monitoring capabilities for build and repeated jobs run by cron. It's typically used for two purposes, building software projects continuously and monitoring job executions. The tool is Java-based and works with containers and servers such as Tomcat.  It has a web-based interface for configuration management and lets users brows or write plugins to extend native capabilities.

What Users Say

"Hudson has been a solid continuous integration, continuous delivery, continuous build and automation tool for years. It's hard to fault. It works, it's free, easy to install and works amazing with Java.  If you there was no Jenkins, Hudson would be a no brainer to use," said one Hudson reviewer  

Continuous integration is a crucial component of a coder’s software portfolio. While proprietary software comes at a premium, open-source tools reduce costs and allow for more flexibility. The programs on this list help companies execute and test code so they can detect problems early on in the software development cycle.

Be sure to check out the entire continuous integration category on G2 Crowd to browse all types of CI tools.